Food Parmigiana

Discussion in 'UK Wine Forum' started by Martin Zwick, May 30, 2020.

  1. Oily but tasty. Comfort food from Bella Italia.


    Ingredients


    1 -1.5 kg eggplant, thinly sliced
    500-700ml tomato passata
    400g mozzarella, cubed
    150g Parmesan, grated
    100g Provolone, grated
    basil


    Preparation



    1. Fry the eggplant slices in oil

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    2. Put the slices on kitchen paper. Pre-heat oven to 180-200C

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    3. Add a splash of tomato passata (cooked 15min) to a lasagne form

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    4. Add eggplant slices.

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    5. Also add a bit parmesan

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    6. Then a splash tomato sauce. In addition some basil.

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    7. Finally pieces of mozzarella

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    8. Again slices of eggplant etc etc

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    9. At the end add provolone

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    10. Last but not least mozzarella. In the oven for 30-40min

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    11. After 30-40 min let it rest in the oven for 30min. Serve lukewarm.

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  2. They look like very nice aubergines.
    There are many who suggest grilling or baking the aubergines slices for this, rather than frying them, but I do think this impedes the signature silky richness of this dish; they will release much of their oil when drained on kitchen paper. There is, however, should one's aubergines be less distinguished than Martin's, quite a good argument for peeling them, whether wholly or partly.
     
  3. Martin,
    I note you do not salt the eggplant and leave it to sweat for 20-30 minutes, which I thought was necessary to remove the bitterness. I would be happy to learn that I have been wasting time over the last decade of sweating eggplants if I can avoid another decade or more of sweating them.
     
  4. It was all going so well, until you added the aubergine!
     
    Ben Coffman and Jim Fulcher like this.
  5. I should mention I liove frying. Also to mention I made this at my outdoor kitchen on the countryside. And I used an Italian round eggplant.
     
  6. I thought that this modern eggplant have no bitterness anymore?! Anyway I love bitterness in vegetables in general. I love Raddicchi de Treviso.
     
    Charles Muttar likes this.
  7. Most aubergines aren't bitter, but collapsing the cell walls with some salt does cause them to absorb a bit less oil and to cook a bit more quickly. The same result can be obtained by microwaving the slices on kitchen paper for a short while.
     
    Adrian Wood likes this.
  8. I have recently taken to soaking aubergine slices in brine for an hour. This seems to have the same effect on oil absorption as salting, plus it stops the aubergines from collapsing when cooking (if that's the texture you are after)
     
  9. Of course I know that in these modern times frying is forbidden and the modern cooks use an oven or microwave for their eggplants. BUT I make an exception for Parmigiana.
     
  10. Martin Zwick likes this.
  11. P.S. I should mention my wife hates frying because of the smell and I am allowed frying only at my outdoor kitchen. And she hates dishes based on frying. But even she asked me if there is something left for tomorrow. haha
     
    Nayan Gowda likes this.
  12. Yummy.

    Just curious, Martin, in Germany if one sees Parmigiana on a menu, is the Melanzane automatically implied, rather like in America?
     
  13. I prefer that to dry salting- it's amazing how brown the brine gets.
     
  14. Of course.
     
  15. I believe there is actually a cookbook called ‘Don’t sweat the aubergines’.
     
  16. I have to say that my italian eggplant was solid, but nothing beats eggplants from Sicily. Once a year I am in Sicily and the vegetable&fruit quality is simply stunning.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
    Jim Agar likes this.
  17. And a good read it is too, but more of a guide to cooking and reading recipes than a cookbook.
     
  18. One place where Melanzane is definitely not implied is Teeside where 'Parmo' usually implies 'with chips.'
     
    Ben Coffman likes this.
  19. P.S. no surprise, much better on day 2. Served cold! Now the eggplant flavor is on full display, much stronger than yesterday. Bottom-line, make the Parmigiana a day before and serve lukewarm or cold.
     
    Jim Agar likes this.
  20. Still much better the second day even if served warm.
     

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