Food Lockdown Loaves

Discussion in 'UK Wine Forum' started by Bryan Collins, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. But Tom's question is different - while it's possible to eat a Big Mac by inserting sandwich into mouth, this is not viable with some of the newer breed of multi-storey burgers. I also use a knife and fork for these.
     
    Mark Gough likes this.
  2. Atavistic, I’d say. Quite like a Pizza wheelie knife thing in one hand and fingers of other.
     
  3. The correct way to eat pizza when at the table is to cut a suitably sized piece and then use your fingers.
     
  4. Someone just sent me this meme on WhatsApp, I thought it particularly pertinent to this forum and thread...

    20200513_172823.jpg
     
  5. But are you allowed to leave a bite mark, as it isn't bread and butter:)
     
  6. Many thanks. I am getting much improved results at 60% hydration, combined with watching the proving process like a hawk. With the last loaf, I also started off with a traditional kneading which seemed to improve the final dough texture (no autolysis). I find that, for some reason, spelt bread tastes saltier than other bread (perhaps due to density?). and so have reduced the amount of salt I am adding.
     
    Thom Blach likes this.
  7. Well, after my first, disastrous, attempt at golf for two months yesterday, I'm appalled to admit that I may have to ditch the sport entirely and take up baking full time.
     
  8. I'm hoping to get a round in this weekend, Jim, my club still isn't open as yet but they are hoping to give the green light tomorrow.

    Somehow I can't see me smashing a hole in one on the 1st like that chap on BBC news yesterday. I'd bite your hand off for 90, and l'd probably settle for anything under 100 to be honest!
     
    Jim Agar likes this.
  9. For the round, that is, not the 1st hole!!
     
    Alex Jagger likes this.
  10. Well we did wonder:D
     
  11. I won the first hole(par 4) yesterday with a cheeky 8 after taking 4 to hack it into the brook, short of the green, drop, then a miraculous chip and two putt. Luckily my son, off 9, lost his drive right before a couple of unmentionables and a pick up. High quality golf all round. Forecast better for tomorrow, well at least no North Easterly gale!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2020
    Alex Jagger likes this.
  12. It has only just struck me (as I am preparing pizza) how terrible/amusing that sounds! Adding an "oo-er missus" therefore . . .
     
  13. 95D53F6C-554F-45BF-A380-6B0C6524CC64.jpeg This morning’s sourdough, 95% strong white and 5% light rye from the starter, 75% hydration and 2% salt. Without a banneton, I’m struggling to get a good, stable shape before cooking, so I tried doing all the folding and bulk fermentation yesterday and kept it in a small, rounded aluminium bowl, lined with a floured tea towel, in the fridge overnight before tipping into the le Creuset this morning. Still slightly puddled, certainly not the stiff, stable shape I see on YouTube videos but it must have had decent oven spring so reasonably happy with the result. Any suggestions?
     
    Mark Palmer likes this.
  14. This mornings sourdough. Rye starter, white flour.

    IMG_5754.JPG
     
  15. That’s a nicer shape, Andrew!
     
  16. If you want more stability you'll need less water or different kinds of flour-which strong white is it? as with most things in life when we gain something we lose something also. It looks pretty good to me, but 75% is high for white flour and low for brown.
     
  17. That’s interesting Tom. I’ve got supplies of Wessex Mill and Marriage’s strong white, which I think are good producers. What sort of % hydration should I be looking for in a white loaf?
     
    G. W o l f f likes this.
  18. Is it Marriage's Canadian or the other? if the protein is fairly low, ie under about 13.5%, I think 70% is practical, but using 10% wholemeal wheat or rye will mean another 5 or 10% water can easily be used.
    It seems to me, though not to others, that it is quite easy to lose structural stability by overworking the dough, but that again depends very much on the flour.
     
    Jim Agar likes this.
  19. Not the Canadian, I’ll check the protein content. Thanks.
     
  20. I’m only carrying out three sets of stretch and folds so hopefully that’s not overworking the dough. No kneading,in the old fashioned sense, certainly.
     
  21. Is the 'ear' mostly a result of baking directly from the fridge?
     
  22. I thought it was due to the angle of the score but that’s only something I’ve read.
     
  23. BB5FFB5F-667D-4845-B161-AC69F6494C37.jpeg 5958CBA1-89D8-4791-A0C9-A5594960EAC6.jpeg

    Round enough for you Jim? Freehand shaping. I fold in from opposite sides, rotate 90 degrees, then fold in from opposite sides. 45 degrees opposite sides, and again. Invert and then with my dough scraper tighten the top by pulling across and then towards me. A couple of those will finish the shape. And then into the cloche via the proving basket (just to give me control of the dough and cloche position. It’s a very tight fit].

    Cooked with the dough at about 15-16C at a guess Tom. Has a little ear. Cold(ish) dough being your ear theory?
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2020
    Andrew Blunsden and Jim Agar like this.
  24. I’m currently running 25% brown 75% white in my recipe at 80% hydration, so that seems to work pretty much exactly to your theory Tom! I’m currently running 50/50 split in the white flours Canadian at 15+g and Stoate’s which I’m guessing is around 13g or so.

    I feel this to be about the maximum I can run to with this recipe. It’s wobbly and just about at my dough handling limit.
     
    Thom Blach likes this.
  25. Just played my first round.....only managed 1 par on the whole round, my approach play killed me, as I kept missing greens meaning I'd have needed to 1 putt for par (not happening). On the positive side I didn't have any total meltdowns (a solitary triple bogey was as bad as it got), and my putting was mostly OK. 98, which is +27. It could have been a hell of a lot worse!!
     
    Alex Jagger and Jim Agar like this.

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