Independent food suppliers

Discussion in 'UK Wine Forum' started by Alex Lake, Apr 7, 2020.

  1. Basco for Spanish - used them a few times & they are excellent. That's where my suckling pig came from.
     
    Uillaim Tait likes this.
  2. I've recently been enjoying products from hermanoshoyos.es and salumifrati.it, but there are very many in Spain and Italy who will send direct and pretty much as quickly as a UK company. Hard to know whether that situation will continue.
     
    Uillaim Tait likes this.
  3. Basco for Spanish.

    Years ago, I used to use a firm called Savoria for Italian. They had some good stuff, but unfortunately went bust, and I've not found a replacement.
     
  4. Yes, I've got my eye on one of those, though I'm still using up last week's small fruit & veg box. Fortunately they've now extended their free next-day delivery using their own vans to include my postcode.
     
  5. Savoria was started by the UK agent for Esperya when it inevitably went under. Esperya was fantastic, the very best of everything, too cheaply and too early, I guess.
    You might try foodexplore.
     
  6. There's also Mevalco, who seem less good on meat and fish but quite strong on cupboardy stuff.
     
    Uillaim Tait likes this.
  7. Alternative Meats delivery finally arrived today.

    All looks good. Some of it had started defrosting, but that's ok, as the freezer is getting very full.

    I'll have the mangalitza gammon with some Cacklebean eggs when they arrive from Wellocks on Saturday. Looking forward to the mangalitza sausages, as a change to the treacle sausages from Blackburn's Tom Wood.

    IMG_20200521_123010.jpg IMG_20200521_123527.jpg
     
  8. By the way...

    What are people doing with all the gel-ice-pack things that come in most deliveries of fresh and frozen food?

    I reckon I've got about 5kg of them here:

    IMG_20200521_135618.jpg
     
  9. Taking only the meat, and discounting the fat, I find the fillet is almost invariably nicer than the sirloin in a T-bone steak. I am really not sure how fillet gained its reputation for tenderness at the expense of flavour.
     
    Bryan Collins likes this.
  10. Possibly because cheap fillet can be really pretty nasty, and if cooked more than rare has a strong liverish twang.
    I find the particularly distinct tastes of the different parts of the animal very interesting and I wouldn't want to put them in order of merit, every part having its place. I recently discovered that the usually extremely tedious silverside can be exceptional if cooked rare and served cold. Fillet can be excellent but I leave it to others who like it more. I like the onglet best of all but it's as hard to find properly aged as fillet.
     
  11. My cut of choice from t&g back when they were Elsco was the barrel fillet they did from specific breeds which came tied to a good bit of fat. Delicious and meltingly tender.
     
    Leon Marks and Richard Zambuni like this.
  12. How did you do with the On the Pass guinea fowl, Mark? I ordered one and it had the darkest dark meat I have ever seen on a guinea fowl. I roasted it at high heat but wasn't that happy with the result and would cook it more gently next time.
     
  13. Arriving tomorrow Ben.

    Thanks for the tip!
     
  14. I tend to give them to my weekly veg box people who seem happy to recommission them for their own service!
     
    Andrew Stevenson likes this.
  15. Bryan mentioned a vegetable box as a gesture towards the “5 a day” guidance.

    It made me smile to think that the 5 a day guidance centring around this thread might be along the lines of......

    Lockdown Loaf with homemade butter and/or Marmalade from the Dalemain champion.

    Pizza, any homemade version from “the book”

    Meat from On the pass, or similar supplier.

    Cheese,say Kingstone Rollright.

    Top chocolate, minimum 55% cocao.

    Oh and Pastifico pasta with Amerigo 1934 sauce worked into grazing opportunities.

    The permutations and menu items could be varied but there would be little call for all that salad and veg box malarkey:D
     
  16. Surely the forum 5 a day is:

    Sparkling
    White
    Rosé
    Red
    Fortified

    No??? :p
     
  17. Well my long awaited short ribs should be arriving today.
    Having reread this thread I’m dithering about the best way to cook them.
    What is the consensus amongst those that have cooked them?
    Ordinarily I tend to braise this cut slowly as per Bryan’s ragout recipe.
    I want to grill these on our imitation Egg. Long and slow or flash cook?
     
  18. I'd go the fast route myself, by the time it's well coloured on both sides( I wouldn't separate the ribs but probably take the bones out) it should be done, after a long warm rest.
     
  19. Hi Ian,
    I've tried them a couple of ways on my imitation BGE.
    Both times I separated the bones and salted overnight.
    First go was direct heat, about 200c, turning frequently. They took about 20 mins to get up to low 50s internal temp. Rested 10 mins.

    Second go I cooked over indirect heat at 110c until internal temp was 50c and then browned them over direct heat. Internal temp finished up mid 50s.

    Slightly preferred the second method, the meat was a bit more tender. Not much in it though and both were delicious!
     
    Peter Webb likes this.
  20. I’ve got a pair so I will report back. I’ve lit the grill so slow cooking the first set
    Chris when you say separate the bones you mean cut the block in to 4-5 down the ribs?
    Salting overnight I take to mean generously ripened in sea salt, not brined or any such idea?
     
  21. I separated the bones by cutting horizontally through the joint so the bones all came off as one piece. In the same way as Thom describes I think.
    For the slow cook method I combine the meat and bones back together but then separate them for the browning.

    Not sure if I’m making any sense!

    The salting is as you as say Ian, not brining just a good sprinkle of salt all over and then over night in the fridge. The idea is the salt draws water out of the meat which dissolves the salt to form a concentrated brine which then diffuses in to the meat and so seasons it right through and also allows the proteins to hold onto more juice during cooking.
     
  22. This picture is just before the bones and meat are separated. Kind of butterflied or opened like a book. Meat is on the left, bones on the right.

    IMG-20200515-WA0000.jpeg
     
    Will Devize likes this.
  23. 4 hours at 110c, quick blast at the end to crisp up the fat.
    I’ve eaten some good meat over the years, these ribs were up there. So juicy and flavoursome. I’m under orders to cook the second piece the same way although I will salt overnight first.

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  24. I was thinking of cutting around the rib bones individually and removing them, but I don't think you can go wrong either way.
     
  25. My local cheese shop has reopened (Black Mouse in Pudsey), they are posting a list of available cheeses (and wines) on their facebook page, taking phone orders and payment on a Friday afternoon and then delivering on the Friday evening. Local drops only, minimum spend £20.

    In the interests of supporting a local business that I really value, and despite still having about a kilo left from my Courtyard Dairy order, I bought 4 cheeses yesterday - Yellison's Goat's, Lincolnshire Poacher Double Barrel, Whittington Red and Rothbury Red. Sadly the West Country Brie had already sold out, I was itching for something soft and ripe.

    The owner has said the issue all along has been getting hold of stock, with his usual supply lines just not functioning properly. Fingers crossed he has weathered that particular storm now.
     
    Leon Marks and Alex Jagger like this.

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